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How Much Does a Dental Cleaning Cost Without Insurance?

How Much Does a Dental Cleaning Cost Without Insurance?

Posted May 05, 2017 by Jenifer Dorsey

Routine dental exams and cleanings are an important part of preventive dental care. A typical preventive dental visit will include an exam and professional cleaning, as well as topical fluoride and a set of X-rays, depending on your last dental visit and personal oral care needs. These visits, along with daily brushing and flossing, play an important role in maintaining good oral health.[1]

Without dental insurance, consumers will find the national average costs of common preventive services such as cleanings and exams vary from region to region and dentist to dentist.

Readers of consumer information site CostHelper.com report paying $80 to $175 for just a routine cleaning performed by a dental hygienist (an average of $127) and anywhere from $114 to $320 for a complete teeth cleaning appointment that typically includes dental X-rays and an exam by a dentist (an average of $198).[2]

The 2016 Dental Economics annual fee survey conducted by the Academy of Dental CPAs and Dental Economics showed fees in the 50th percentile by region, as follows[3]:

Northeast

Comprehensive exam (fee code D0150) – $101

Prophylaxis (cleaning; fee code D1110) – $110

Mid-Atlantic

Comprehensive exam (fee code D0150) – $90

Prophylaxis (cleaning; fee code D1110) – $95

Midwest

Comprehensive exam (fee code D0150) – $85

Prophylaxis (cleaning; fee code D1110) – $92

South

Comprehensive exam (fee code D0150) – $84

Prophylaxis (cleaning; fee code D1110) – $88

Mountain

Comprehensive exam (fee code D0150) – $89

Prophylaxis (cleaning; fee code D1110) – $97

However, with dental insurance, preventive care may cost you little or nothing on top of your monthly premium, depending on the plan you select. Because dental coverage is designed with preventive care in mind, many dental plans cover two preventive care visits per year at or near 100 percent.

Ultimately, contacting your dentist’s office is the best way to find out what a routine dental exam and cleaning as well as other dental services will cost you out of pocket. If you do have dental insurance, you will need to consult your plan benefits or contact your dental insurance company to find out how various dental services are covered by your policy.

If you don’t have access to dental insurance through an employer, you can purchase an individual dental plan online through websites such as healthedeals.com or through a health insurance producer (i.e., agent or broker).

 

How much is dental insurance? Get a quote!

 

What does dental insurance cover?

Preventive dental benefits included in employer and individual plans typically include professional cleanings, routine exams, X-rays (may be limited to one set per year), topical fluoride, and sealants (may be dependent on age). Benefits and frequency for each service will vary by plan, so be sure to read plan details carefully when selecting dental insurance coverage.

Dental insurance plans may also include benefits to help reduce the cost of basic care such as fillings and extractions and major care such as crowns and root canals.

 

Shop for a dental plan online

 

Have questions about choosing the best dental insurance plan for your oral health needs and budget?

Call the number at the top of your screen to speak with a licensed producer about plans available through healthedeals.com and get a quick, no-pressure quote. You can also use our Agent Finder tool to find a local agent who sells dental plans.

 

 


Legal Disclaimers


[1] American Dental Association. “Oral Health.” Accessed May 4, 2017. http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/o/oral-health

[2] CostHelper Health. “How Much Does Teeth Cleaning Cost?” Accessed May 4, 2017. http://health.costhelper.com/teeth-cleaning.html

[3] The Academy of Dental CPAs and Dental Economics. “The Dental Economics Annual Fee Survey.” Dental Economics. July 19, 2016. http://www.dentaleconomics.com/articles/print/volume-106/issue-7/macroeconomics/the-dental-economics-annual-fee-survey.html